Comic-Con 2011 Four-Day Passes Sell Out in Under 3 Hours

February 05, 2011

Comic-Con 2011 four-day passes were hard enough to come by based on interest, much less technical difficulties.

Passes for the annual gathering of film, comic book, toy and gaming enthusiasts went on sale earlier today and was met by a stampede of buyers with credit cards in-hand. The ticketing vendor for the process, Ticketleap.com, buckled multiple times under the strain of fulfilling requests.

Interest in the four-day passes was so intense that even with the outages all were sold through in roughly two-and-a-half hours. Many people who were hoping to make the trek to San Diego and hit up the convention center for Thursday through Sunday had to walk away empty-handed.

As of Saturday evening, one-day Comic-Con passes were still remaining but those do little good for out-of-towners. Many of Comic-Cons must-see panels and unveiling of new footage are spread across multiple days. It wouldn't make much sense to spend the travel and accommodations money and only get to see a sampling of what the show has to offer.

This year's Comic-Con in particular is poised to be perhaps the biggest yet. In a battle of screaming female tweens versus comic book faithful, Summit Entertainment will present new footage and the stars of The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 while Marvel and Paramount will counter with likely the first public footage from The Avengers.

In addition to those two huge properties, Warner Bros. and DC Comics should be ready to share the first footage or at least images from The Dark Knight Rises, the third and final Batman film from Christopher Nolan. Other films expected to appear in some form include David Fincher's version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Men in Black 3, Marvel and Columbia Pictures' Spider-Man reboot, The Hunger Games, John Carter of Mars, Battleship, Prometheus, and Zack Snyder's Superman reboot.

The Comic-Con fiasco today, which many people wasted a solid portion of their day on only to come up short, underscores the argument of either moving Comic-Con to a more spacious venue or splitting it up into a series of smaller more targeted conventions. For now the San Diego Convention Center is the venue, and interest in Comic-Con will continue to outgrow its confines until the issue is addressed.